Saturday, January 31, 2015

Fluwatch: influenza 2015 STATS, admissions and deaths


There is still discussions around the flu shots. The issue is that the flu strains changed and mutated, and yet, it is still a good idea to get a shot at the beginning of the season. The graphs are showing a downturn in reported flu cases, thankfully.
It's starting to slow down.

Many viruses


Canadian Maps from previous weeks, including any retrospective updates, are available on the FluWatch website.

The time it takes from the start to the finish of a vaccine production, is sometimes sufficient time for the virus to change, which is what happened this year in particular with H3N2. Evidence from the NML, however, still suggests that the vaccine continues to provide protection against the circulating A(H1N1) and B strains.


A total of 104 ICU admissions have been reported in adults ≥65 years of age with influenza A and 52 ICU admissions have been reported in adults 20-64 years. A total of 236 deaths have been reported since the start of the season: one child under 5 years of age, two children 5 - 19 years old, 16 adults between 20 and 64 years, and 217 adults older than age 65. Adults 65 or older represent 92% of all deaths reported this season.

Toronto has it bad, of course the big cities, with more people, more people moving around, say, a transit system.

1,035 people hospitalized and 56 have died of flu this season in Toronto

Public Health in Toronto says flu cases this winter are above the 10-year average. An analysis finds virtually all the flu viruses in Canada this year are different from the one in the vaccine

Influenza remains on the increase in Toronto, with 428 confirmed cases of the flu in the third week of January. So far this season, 1,035 people have been hospitalized with influenza or suspected influenza in Toronto and 56 people have died as of Jan. 24.
The numbers don’t include anyone who come down with flu and not been treated by a doctor.
School absenteeism also continues to rise as the total number of cases in Toronto has hit 3,072, above the previous 10-year average. Those troubling numbers (PDF) were reported by Toronto Public Health on Friday.
 

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