Wednesday, October 22, 2014

CANADIAN CARDIOVASCULAR CONGRESS 2014

CCC logoccc free media registration



 




Attention:   MEDICAL / SCIENCE / HEALTH/ LIFESTYLE WRITERS / EDITORS
 

WHO: THE HEART AND STROKE FOUNDATION AND THE CANADIAN CARDIOVASCULAR SOCIETY
WHAT: CANADIAN CARDIOVASCULAR CONGRESS 2014
WHERE: VANCOUVER CONVENTION CENTRE 
WHEN: OCt. 25 - 28

 
SATURDAY OCTOBER 25
  • Getting to the Heart of the Matter: Lack of physical activity, tobacco use, poor diets, inappropriate advertising of poor food and beverage choices to children and excessive consumption of sugar, particularly in sugary drinks, and salt. HSF Lecturer Dr. Perry Kendall, B.C.’s provincial health officer, opens the Congress by looking at how our health system is threatened with being flooded by these challenges ─ and how health professionals can lead the push for changes to the environment that contribute to these deep-seated problems.
 
MONDAY OCTOBER 27
  • How do mental health disorders impact your risks for heart disease or stroke?Study investigates how psychiatric medications, unhealthy behaviours and issues accessing care impact one’s risk.
     
  • When it comes to the blood used for heart surgery...does age matter? A study looking at the age of stored blood used for transfusions in over 2,000 heart surgery patients has some surprising results.
     
  • Ethnicity and heart disease: A Toronto study looks at the widely varying differences in Canada’s ethnic groups’ risks for developing heart disease – and at their awareness of what is and isn’t a risk factor.
 
TUESDAY OCTOBER 28
  • Robotically assisted bypass surgery: A look at the impressive results of this rapidly evolving technology, which is now being used in Vancouver, Montreal and London.
     
  • First Canadian recommendations on inherited high cholesterol: If not detected early, inherited high cholesterol can lead to severe cardiac disease and death at an early age, but if detected early it is so eminently treatable you can essentially normalize the patient’s cardiovascular risk. Establishment of a national registry and family-screening program aims to save lives.
     
  • Women play dangerous waiting game with heart symptoms: Study looking at how people perceive their heart symptoms and at what stage they are prompted to seek medical care, finds that women are putting their lives at risk by how they respond to their symptoms.

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