Saturday, May 5, 2012

A Generational Comparison of Social Networking Site Use: The Influence of Age and Social Identity

I came across a study of social networking (see below).
Somebody tell me why they did not study people above age 64?
Lots of residents play Wii in LTC
Skypeing with daughter and granddaughter!
I have friends in LTC who play video games, Skype with family, and unwind with Wii.

The pharmaceuticals do not do drug tests on people above age 65, either. Nor do they study people with comorbidities. This is shameful. Drug interactions are important.

Imagine my shock when this trivial study didn't include people 65+. Where I volunteer, PCCC, they are teaching 95-year-olds how to use computers.

80+ playing solitaire on computer.
For those with arthritis in their hands,
this is ideal!
When talking about 'the influence of age', surely they could have examined people above age 64. Many of us retirees keep in touch with family and friends on-line. We learned to use these tools for work - no reason why we wouldn't use them for play.

This study doesn't choose a valid population. An 'on-line survey', doesn't tell us who they found.

The International Journal of Aging and Human Development
Issue: Volume 74, Number 2 / 2012
Pages: 163 - 187

A Generational Comparison of Social Networking Site Use: The Influence of Age and Social Identity
Valerie Barker A1
A1  San Diego State University
Abstract:
An online survey (N = 256) compared social networking site (SNS) use among younger (millennial: 18-29) and older (baby-boomer: 41-64) subscribers focusing on the influence of collective self-esteem and group identity on motives for SNS use. Younger participants reported higher positive collective self-esteem, social networking site use for peer communication, and social compensation. Regardless of age, participants reporting high collective self-esteem and group identity were more likely to use social networking sites for peer communication and social identity gratifications, while those reporting negative collective self-esteem were more likely to use social networking sites for social compensation. The theoretical implications of the strong relationship between social identity gratifications and social compensation are discussed.


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